Rutgers University
















Economics, inter alia, on the Internet

  1. Rutgers University Libraries' Economics Research Guide (maintained by Ryan Womack, Business Information Services Librarian; cited all over the Internet because of its comprehensiveness)
  2. For nuts-and-bolts information on where and how to do economics research on campus (be it in New Jersey Hall, in Alexander Library, or out on the net, check An Economics Scrapbook (compiled by former economics bibliographer Miles Yoshimura and economics professor Ira Gang).
  3. Invest on the Iowa electronic markets, real-money futures markets in which contract payoffs depend on economic and political events such as elections.
  4. Three brief Java-applet-based reviews of elasticity and consumer theory are available from UCLA.
  5. The game theory page from Dr. Moon Joong Tcha's International Trade course at the University of Western Australia uses several examples to explain dominant strategies, dominant strategy equilibria, and Nash equilibria.
  6. Get a better feel for the trade-offs citizens and policy makers need to make to balance the budget with the National Budget Simulation.
  7. Try your hand at FAIRMODEL , a macroeconometric model of the U.S. economy developed by Prof. Ray Fair at Yale, to forecast the economy, do policy analysis, and examine historical episodes. For example, you can change government policy variables and examine the estimated effects of the changes on the economy.
  8. Economics of the Internet, Information Goods, Intellectual Property and Related Issues, maintained by Hal Varian, Dean of the School of Information Management and Systems at Berkeley
  9. Economic Report of the President
  10. WebEc, a wide-ranging collection of economics links
  11. Resources for Economists on the Internet, Bill Goffe's regularly updated survey on what's out there
  12. Jokes about Economics and Economists, mostly fairly lame (as you'd expect?), but a number of gems are scattered through this extensive list
  13. Things to do in a boring lecture, for use, of course, in your other classes